in old stuff

Fidelity Investments: Used Car For Sale, Everying Perfect, Ignore Blurred Image

Used CarIn the November 3rd issue of The Economist, I came across an ad for Fidelity Investments that caught my attention. They had a matrix of information showing investment returns for some of their international funds. The Fidelity International Small Cap Opportunities Fund, posted 31% under 1 year, “N/A” under 5 year, and 31% under the 10 year column. “Not Available”…are you kidding? Why run an ad (and an expensive one I’m sure) in a format that forces you to either publish something embarrassing or omit something in a ridiculous way. It’s like if they sent out a Q&A press release with some of the answers marked as “no comment” http://levitrakamagra.com/. The whole point of an advertisement is that you control the medium, the content, the format, and everything else, all of which exists for the sole purpose of delivering a flawless message. At least superficially flawless. The fund in question has the highest 10 year return of all three. Why not just make that 10 year 31% return an anecdotal aspect of the ad, and leave it out of the matrix? On top of all that, the ad has a whopping 6 footnotes! Nice work. Below: the ad in all of its glory.

Fidelity Ad